Art In Bloom Dazzles With Creativity In North Carolina

Scot Buck, Emerald City Flower Co., inspired by Station (577-2), Gerhard Richter.

Scot Buck, Emerald City Flower Co., inspired by Station (577-2), Gerhard Richter.

All across the country, museums have found that an Art in Bloom event – where floral artists interpret the museum’s existing paintings- are both crowd-pleasers and moneymakers.

Now that the pandemic is waning as a result of people being vaccinated, the museums are finally and happily opening up their doors to visitors.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s annual event is open now through June 13th. “The displays this year were bigger and better than ever,” notes museum spokesperson Kat Harding. “I think the designers really had some pent-up creativity for this event since we had to cancel in 2020 due to the pandemic.”

Bess Treadwell, Raleigh Garden Club, inspiration Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), by Amy Sherald.

Bess Treadwell, Raleigh Garden Club, inspiration Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), by Amy Sherald.

Vicki Thompson, Raleigh Garden Club, inspired by Landscape in Equador by Louis Remy Mignot.

Vicki Thompson, Raleigh Garden Club, inspired by Landscape in Equador by Louis Remy Mignot.

So get inspired by these artists – both the floral ones and the ones who use paint instead of branches and blooms.

Perhaps consider what to do with your own paintings in your home. Think of it as accessorizing.

Margaret Knox, inspired by The Adoration of the Shepherds, Jacob Jordaens.

Margaret Knox, inspired by The Adoration of the Shepherds, Jacob Jordaens.

Elizabeth Zimmerman, Elizabeth Zimmerman Florals, inspired by Mrs. James Russell (Katherine Graves) (1717-1788), John Singleton Copley.

Elizabeth Zimmerman, Elizabeth Zimmerman Florals, inspired by Mrs. James Russell (Katherine Graves) (1717-1788), John Singleton Copley.

Even those who are advised to buy art for investment are told to “buy what you love” so you can live with it. Therefore, art pieces that are purchased for a home are both treasured and valuable either sentimentally, financially, or both.

But sometimes people don’t think of how to enhance these paintings with other objects.

Here are some ideas, whether it’s for modern art or more contemporary art, in how you can learn from these masters and think of accessorizing art with floral designs.

Christopher Batts, A Prideful Place.

Christopher Batts, A Prideful Place.


A version of this story originally appeared on FlowerPowerDaily.com.

Jill Brooke is a former CNN correspondent, Post columnist and editor-in-chief of Avenue and Travel Savvy magazine. She is an author and the editorial director of FPD, and a contributing digital editor of aspire design and home magazine.

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