Meta Morphosis with Interior Designer Ginny Zonfrilli

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[caption id=”attachment_25442″ align=”alignleft” width=”350″]Office The dark-hued library creates a dramatic focal point.[/caption]

After originally purchasing a singular Manhattan apartment as a pieda-terre for weekend use, these bold homeowners ultimately opted to purchase two adjacent apartments. “The renovation needed to include all of the amenities and conveniences equal to their primary residence,” interior designer Ginny Zonfrilli of VHZ Design Group says of the project, which resulted in more than 4,000 square feet of living space.

The overarching design scheme, with its striking lines and historic reverence, took cues from the client’s extant tastes and objects. It was important, for example, that the clients’ art collection and several key pieces of their furniture were implemented into the new apartment. The designer notes those furnishings were “transitional in style and required a more detailed architectural environment.”

[caption id=”attachment_25444″ align=”alignright” width=”350″]ParkAveApartmMBed The master bedroom is a dreamy retreat with a blush palette and sculptural coffered ceilings.[/caption]

Enter architect Stephen Kowalski of SEK Architect who designed the details to lend importance to the different spaces and to create a historical reference to the era’s building construction.

“The architectural details provide consistency throughout the apartment along with the color scheme of gray and taupe with black and gold accents,” Zonfrilli explains. “This allowed for unity of the spaces and created visual interest with the use of different materials and textures.”

The beauty in such built elements, like the highly detailed plaster moldings and coffered ceilings designed by Kowalski, is how they disguise a complex array of existing beam locations that needed to be concealed throughout the apartment.

Moving from space to space, the consistent, neutral palette is punctuated with rich hues and patterns – from a dreamy lilac to a daring zebra – to lend individuality to each area of the home.

The clients’ art collection demanded a stage all its own, and proper lighting was considered crucial to the project. To achieve the desired effect, a combination of strategically placed recessed fixtures, recessed track lighting and decorative fixtures were selected to provide “a level of ambiance that was punctuated by exciting accents of light,” Zonfrilli notes.

Sitting in elegant contrast to the lighter tone of the home, a dark-hued library was designed as a dramatic focal point within the curated decor. Also serving as a home office, the library boasts ebonized floor-to-ceiling cabinetry that surrounds the room to provide space for work, filing and shelving, while also maintaining the attention to architectural detail evidenced throughout the apartment.

“The finish for the cabinetry is dark stained walnut with a black over glaze,” Zonfrilli shares, adding that the glaze “allows for the wood grain to be seen and provides more depth than a standard black painted finish.”

Depth in the design is key throughout the home, as no one element exists as a singular thought. Lighting refers to art, art to furnishings, furnishings to newly imagined historic architectural details in a graceful flow that carries the eye from the warmth of one space to the regency of the next and creates intrigue at every turn.

Photography | Peter Rymwid Architectural Photography

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